Examining the Dangers of Hypnosis

See the source image

I have often said that when it comes to hypnosis, there are literally no negative side-effects connected with its practice when it is performed by a trained and qualified individual.  Nevertheless, there are some who believe hypnosis can be a negative factor, causing a variety of problems, including fatigue, antisocial acting out, anxiety, panic attacks, concentration loss, delusional thinking, depression, insomnia, tremors, weeping, and a host of other complaints.

First, let me note that I have hypnotized close to 1,000 individuals and I have never seen any of the above symptoms arise–or had them reported at a later date.  Since some claim that these things do happen, however, I looked into what they were saying.  In one online article, the author provides a much more comprehensive list of problems he claims can occur with hypnosis, including things such as fainting, fear of fearfulness, guilt, headache, histrionic reactions, identity crisis, insomnia, irritability, nausea, vomiting, obsessive ruminations, over dependency, personality change, phobic aversion, psychosis, sexual acting out, sexual dysfunction, somatization, spontaneous trance, stress, lowered threshold, stupor, and tactile hallucinations.  And this is not the complete list.

Once again, I have to say that none of my hypnotherapy patients has exhibited any of the symptoms above, nor were they later reported.  Allowing for the remote statistical probability that my patients have avoided these outcomes due to random chance, I read further into this article until I was finally able to discern the cause of some reported cases (he cites four case examples).  It appears that in at least some of these cases, the probl